Definition Applied Linguistic

Nama   : Nabiella Syifarani

Nim     : 2201410090

Definition and the scope of applied linguistics

1. Applied linguistics is an interdisciplinary field of research and practice dealing with practical problems of language and communication that can be identified, analysed or solved by applying available theories, methods or results of Linguistics or by developing new theoretical and methodological frameworks in linguistics to work on these problems.

(Brumfit, C. J. (1995), ‘Teacher professionalism and research’, in G. Cook and B. Seidlhofer (eds.) Principle and Practice in Applied Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press)

2. Applied linguistics is an area of work that deals with language use in professional settings, translation, speech pathology, literacy, and language education; and it is not merely the application of linguistic knowledge to such settings but is a semiautonomous and interdisciplinary domain of work that draws on but is not dependent on areas such as sociology, education, anthropology, cultural studies, and psychology.

(Alastair Pennycook, Critical Applied Linguistics: A Critical Introduction. Routledge, 2001)

3. Applied linguistics began life in the 1950s as a postgraduate qualification. Its initial target, largely language teaching, has always been practical, policy-oriented. Its preparation at postgraduate level has been multidisciplinary and, as in mathematics, there is a continuing tension between pure (general, theoretical) linguistics and applied linguistics. It does not expect its conclusions to be buttressed with certainty (and it is unclear whether theoretical linguistics or any other social science can expect that, either). For applied linguistics, there is no finality: the problems such as how to assess language proficiency, what is the optimum age to begin a second language, what distinguishes native and non-native speakers, how we can treat memory loss, these problems may find local and temporary solutions but the problems recur. No doubt, once again, the same may be said of theoretical linguistics: whether all grammars are fundamentally one grammar; what the relation is between the sign and the referent answers are partial, never final–the problems remain.

(Alan Davies, An Introduction to Applied Linguistics: From Practice to Theory, 2nd ed. Edinburgh Univ. Press, 2007)

4. Applied linguistics is any attempt to work with language in a critical and reflective way, with some ultimate practical goal in mind. This includes (amongst other things): deliberately trying to learn (or teach) a foreign language or to develop your ability in your native language; overcoming a language impairment; translating from one language to another; editing a piece of writing in a linguistically thoughtful way. It also includes doing any research or developing any ideas or tools which aim to help people do these sorts of things.

( Phil Durrant Visiting Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education, Bilkent University

http://www.cambridge.org/servlet/file/store7/item5633198/version1/Article_What%20is%20applied%20linguistics.pdf )

5. ‘Applied linguistics’ (AL) is one of several academic disciplines focusing on how language is acquired and used in the modern world. It is a somewhat eclectic field that accommodates diverse theoretical approaches, and its interdisciplinary scope includes linguistic, psychological and educational topics. Although the field’ s original focus was the study of foreign/second languages, this has been extended to cover first language issues, and nowadays many scholars would consider sociolinguistics and pragmatics to be part of the AL rubric. Recently, AL conferences and journals have reflected the growing influence of psychology-based approaches, which in turn is a reflection of the increasing prevalence of cognitive (neuro)science in the study of human mental functions.

( Zoltán Dörnyei  Professor of Psycholinguistics, University of Nottingham )

http://www.cambridge.org/servlet/file/store7/item5633198/version1/Article_What%20is%20applied%20linguistics.pdf

6. Applied linguistics as it relates to language teaching is  a fairly modern phenomenon. It arose in the 1940′s, in the latter part of the Second World War.

( Albert Weideman, Department of Didactics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville, 7535. E-mail: albertw@uwc.ac.za)

7. The term ‘applied linguistics’ refers to a broad range of activities which involve solving some language-related problem or addressing some language-related concern.

( G. Richard Tucker.(n.d).Applied Linguistic. Retrieved from http://lsadc.org/info/ling-fields-applied.cfm )

8. Applied linguistics is a discipline which explores the relations between theory and practice in language with particular reference to issues of language use. It embraces contexts in which people use and learn languages and is a platform for systematically addressing problems involving the use of language and communication in real-world situations. Applied linguistics draws on a range of disciplines, including linguistics. In consequence, applied linguistics has applications in several areas of language study, including language learning and teaching, the psychology of language processing, discourse analysis, stylistics, corpus analysis, literacy studies and language planning and policies.

( Dawn Knight.2009.What is Applied Linguistic. Retrieved fromhttp://www.scribd.com/doc/16212220/What-is-Applied-Linguistics )

 

9. Applied linguistics is strictly any application of linguistics. But often in practice of a discipline which applies the findings of linguistics, among others, in education: e.g. or especially to teaching English as a foreign or second language.

( The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics. P. H. Matthews. Oxford University Press, 2007. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press )

10. Applied Linguistics, which draws from theories of language acquisition to develop first and second language teaching methodologies and to implement successful literacy programs.

(Crystal, D. (1987). The Cambridge encyclopedia of language. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press )

 

 

 

 

The Scopes of Applied Linguistic

 

 a.      Language and Teaching

This scope covers methods of language teaching. In doing teaching learning activity, linguistic is applied on those methods.

b.      Language and Society

The branch in this scope is called sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistic studies about the relationship between the society and language, and explore/solve the problem related to society that affects the language, varieties of language in society, terms of taboos and euphimism, etc.

c.      Language Education/Learning

This scope tries to explain about the first language education, additional language education such as second language education and foreign language education. It also help us to know about clinical linguistic and language testing. Clinical linguistic is the study about language disability.

d.      Language, Work and Law

The scope of Language, Work and Law explain about communication in the workplace, language planning, and forensic linguistic.

e.      Language, Information and Effect

It studies the literary stylistics, critical discourse analysis, translation and interpretation, information design, and lexicography.

( Mai Mustafa Fouad Ra’fat Ali.(n.d).Applied Linguistic.Retrieved from http://www.scribd.com/doc/58883443/Applied-Linguistics-1-the-Scope-of-Applied-Linguistics)

 

Nama   : Nabiella Syifarani

Nim     : 2201410090

Definition and the scope of applied linguistics

1. Applied linguistics is an interdisciplinary field of research and practice dealing with practical problems of language and communication that can be identified, analysed or solved by applying available theories, methods or results of Linguistics or by developing new theoretical and methodological frameworks in linguistics to work on these problems.

(Brumfit, C. J. (1995), ‘Teacher professionalism and research’, in G. Cook and B. Seidlhofer (eds.) Principle and Practice in Applied Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press)

2. Applied linguistics is an area of work that deals with language use in professional settings, translation, speech pathology, literacy, and language education; and it is not merely the application of linguistic knowledge to such settings but is a semiautonomous and interdisciplinary domain of work that draws on but is not dependent on areas such as sociology, education, anthropology, cultural studies, and psychology.

(Alastair Pennycook, Critical Applied Linguistics: A Critical Introduction. Routledge, 2001)

3. Applied linguistics began life in the 1950s as a postgraduate qualification. Its initial target, largely language teaching, has always been practical, policy-oriented. Its preparation at postgraduate level has been multidisciplinary and, as in mathematics, there is a continuing tension between pure (general, theoretical) linguistics and applied linguistics. It does not expect its conclusions to be buttressed with certainty (and it is unclear whether theoretical linguistics or any other social science can expect that, either). For applied linguistics, there is no finality: the problems such as how to assess language proficiency, what is the optimum age to begin a second language, what distinguishes native and non-native speakers, how we can treat memory loss, these problems may find local and temporary solutions but the problems recur. No doubt, once again, the same may be said of theoretical linguistics: whether all grammars are fundamentally one grammar; what the relation is between the sign and the referent answers are partial, never final–the problems remain.

(Alan Davies, An Introduction to Applied Linguistics: From Practice to Theory, 2nd ed. Edinburgh Univ. Press, 2007)

4. Applied linguistics is any attempt to work with language in a critical and reflective way, with some ultimate practical goal in mind. This includes (amongst other things): deliberately trying to learn (or teach) a foreign language or to develop your ability in your native language; overcoming a language impairment; translating from one language to another; editing a piece of writing in a linguistically thoughtful way. It also includes doing any research or developing any ideas or tools which aim to help people do these sorts of things.

( Phil Durrant Visiting Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education, Bilkent University

http://www.cambridge.org/servlet/file/store7/item5633198/version1/Article_What%20is%20applied%20linguistics.pdf )

5. ‘Applied linguistics’ (AL) is one of several academic disciplines focusing on how language is acquired and used in the modern world. It is a somewhat eclectic field that accommodates diverse theoretical approaches, and its interdisciplinary scope includes linguistic, psychological and educational topics. Although the field’ s original focus was the study of foreign/second languages, this has been extended to cover first language issues, and nowadays many scholars would consider sociolinguistics and pragmatics to be part of the AL rubric. Recently, AL conferences and journals have reflected the growing influence of psychology-based approaches, which in turn is a reflection of the increasing prevalence of cognitive (neuro)science in the study of human mental functions.

( Zoltán Dörnyei  Professor of Psycholinguistics, University of Nottingham )

http://www.cambridge.org/servlet/file/store7/item5633198/version1/Article_What%20is%20applied%20linguistics.pdf

6. Applied linguistics as it relates to language teaching is  a fairly modern phenomenon. It arose in the 1940′s, in the latter part of the Second World War.

( Albert Weideman, Department of Didactics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville, 7535. E-mail: albertw@uwc.ac.za)

7. The term ‘applied linguistics’ refers to a broad range of activities which involve solving some language-related problem or addressing some language-related concern.

( G. Richard Tucker.(n.d).Applied Linguistic. Retrieved from http://lsadc.org/info/ling-fields-applied.cfm )

8. Applied linguistics is a discipline which explores the relations between theory and practice in language with particular reference to issues of language use. It embraces contexts in which people use and learn languages and is a platform for systematically addressing problems involving the use of language and communication in real-world situations. Applied linguistics draws on a range of disciplines, including linguistics. In consequence, applied linguistics has applications in several areas of language study, including language learning and teaching, the psychology of language processing, discourse analysis, stylistics, corpus analysis, literacy studies and language planning and policies.

( Dawn Knight.2009.What is Applied Linguistic. Retrieved fromhttp://www.scribd.com/doc/16212220/What-is-Applied-Linguistics )

 

9. Applied linguistics is strictly any application of linguistics. But often in practice of a discipline which applies the findings of linguistics, among others, in education: e.g. or especially to teaching English as a foreign or second language.

( The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Linguistics. P. H. Matthews. Oxford University Press, 2007. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press )

10. Applied Linguistics, which draws from theories of language acquisition to develop first and second language teaching methodologies and to implement successful literacy programs.

(Crystal, D. (1987). The Cambridge encyclopedia of language. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press )

 

 

 

 

The Scopes of Applied Linguistic

 

 a.      Language and Teaching

This scope covers methods of language teaching. In doing teaching learning activity, linguistic is applied on those methods.

b.      Language and Society

The branch in this scope is called sociolinguistics. Sociolinguistic studies about the relationship between the society and language, and explore/solve the problem related to society that affects the language, varieties of language in society, terms of taboos and euphimism, etc.

c.      Language Education/Learning

This scope tries to explain about the first language education, additional language education such as second language education and foreign language education. It also help us to know about clinical linguistic and language testing. Clinical linguistic is the study about language disability.

d.      Language, Work and Law

The scope of Language, Work and Law explain about communication in the workplace, language planning, and forensic linguistic.

e.      Language, Information and Effect

It studies the literary stylistics, critical discourse analysis, translation and interpretation, information design, and lexicography.

( Mai Mustafa Fouad Ra’fat Ali.(n.d).Applied Linguistic.Retrieved from http://www.scribd.com/doc/58883443/Applied-Linguistics-1-the-Scope-of-Applied-Linguistics)

 

 

 

 

 

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